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    • 22 Feb 2018
    • 12:00 PM - 2:00 PM
    • Riviera Country Club Ballroom, 1155 Blue Road, Coral Gables
    • 3
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    Caesar's Footprints: A Cultural Excursion to Ancient France: Journeys Through Roman Gaul

    Julius Caesar's conquests in Gaul in the 50s BC were bloody, but the cultural revolution they brought in their wake forever transformed the ancient Celtic culture of that country. After Caesar, the Gauls exchanged their tribal quarrels for Roman values and acquired the paraphernalia of civilized urban life. The Romans also left behind a legacy of language, literature, law, government, religion, architecture, and industry.

    Each chapter of Caesar's Footprints is dedicated to a specific journey of exploration through Roman Gaul. From the amphitheatres of Arles and Nîmes to the battlefield of Châlons (where Flavius Aetius defeated Attila the Hun) Bijan―an exciting and authoritative new voice in Roman history―explores archaeological sites, artifacts, and landscapes to reveal how the imprint of Roman culture shaped Celtic France―and thereby helped to create modern Europe.  

    “Without the conquests of Caesar there would have been no Roman Empire—and, so many of us believe, no continuing Freudian impulse for a European Union today. This terrific account lays bare the horror and cruelty of Caesar's campaigns. Bursting with anecdotes and fizzing with unexpected information, Caesar's Footprints compels us to ask: how much does our continent owe to one man and his naked and cynical lust for glory.”—Boris Johnson, British Foreign Secretary

    “A real delight. Caesar’s Footprints exuberantly marches around France and Britain with the Roman legions, vividly bringing the formation of a shared European identity to life. It pulls no punches on the shocking violence and naked self-interest of Caesar’s northern wars. It is a bold vision, elegantly evocative, and an accomplished tribute to year zero of our shared modern European identity.”—Dominic Selwood, author of The Sword of Moses

    Bijan Omrani attended Lincoln College, Oxford. He is the author of various works on Central Asia, including Asia Overland: Tales of Travel on the Trans-Siberian and Silk Road, and also a Fellow of the Royal Asiatic Society and the Royal Geographical Society. He teaches Classics at Westminster School in England.

     Publisher: Pegasus Books

    Photo credit: bijanomrani.com

    DEADLINE FOR REGISTRATION: Thursday, February 15, 2018.

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    • 08 Mar 2018
    • 12:00 PM - 2:00 PM
    • Riviera Country Club Ballroom, 1155 Blue Road, Coral Gables
    • 179
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    Churchill's Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare: The Mavericks Who Plotted Hitler's Defeat

    In the spring of 1939, a top-secret organization was founded in London: its purpose was to plot the destruction of Hitler's war machine, through spectacular acts of sabotage.

    The guerrilla campaign that followed was every bit as extraordinary as the six men who directed it. One of them, Cecil Clarke, was a maverick engineer who had spent the 1930s inventing futuristic caravans. Now, his talents were put to more devious use: he built the dirty bomb used to assassinate Hitler's favorite, Reinhard Heydrich. Another, William Fairbairn, was a portly pensioner with an unusual passion: he was the world's leading expert in silent killing, hired to train the guerrillas being parachuted behind enemy lines. Led by dapper Scotsman Colin Gubbins, these men---along with three others---formed a secret inner circle that, aided by a group of formidable ladies, single-handedly changed the course of the Second World War: a cohort hand-picked by Winston Churchill, whom he called his Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare.

    Giles Milton's Churchill's Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare is a gripping and vivid narrative of adventure and derring-do that is also, perhaps, the last great untold story of the Second World War.

    GILES MILTON is an internationally bestselling author of narrative nonfiction. His books include Nathaniel's Nutmeg--serialized by the BBC--and seven other critically acclaimed works of history. 

     Publisher: Picador

    Photo credit: GilesMilton.com

    DEADLINE FOR REGISTRATION:  Sunday, March 4, 2018

    • 18 Apr 2018
    • 12:00 PM - 2:00 PM
    • Palmeiras Beach Club at Grove Isle | 4 Grove Isle Drive, Miami FL 33133
    • 156
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    Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI

    In the 1920s, the richest people per capita in the world were members of the Osage Indian nation in Oklahoma. After oil was discovered beneath their land, they rode in chauffeured automobiles, built mansions, and sent their children to study in Europe.

    Then, one by one, the Osage began to be killed off. The family of an Osage woman, Mollie Burkhart, became a prime target. Her relatives were shot and poisoned. And it was just the beginning, as more and more members of the tribe began to die under mysterious circumstances.

    In this last remnant of the Wild West--where oilmen like J. P. Getty made their fortunes and where desperadoes like Al Spencer, the "Phantom Terror," roamed--many of those who dared to investigate the killings were themselves murdered. As the death toll climbed to more than twenty-four, the FBI took up the case. It was one of the organization's first major homicide investigations and the bureau badly bungled the case. In desperation, the young director, J. Edgar Hoover, turned to a former Texas Ranger named Tom White to unravel the mystery. White put together an undercover team, including one of the only American Indian agents in the bureau. The agents infiltrated the region, struggling to adopt the latest techniques of detection. Together with the Osage they began to expose one of the most chilling conspiracies in American history.

    In Killers of the Flower Moon, David Grann revisits a shocking series of crimes in which dozens of people were murdered in cold blood. Based on years of research and startling new evidence, the book is a masterpiece of narrative nonfiction, as each step in the investigation reveals a series of sinister secrets and reversals. But more than that, it is a searing indictment of the callousness and prejudice toward American Indians that allowed the murderers to operate with impunity for so long. Killers of the Flower Moon is utterly compelling, but also emotionally devastating. 

    David Grann is a staff writer at The New Yorker and the best-selling author of The Lost City of Z, which was chosen as one of the best books of the year by The New York Times, The Washington Post, and other publications and has been translated into more than twenty-five languages. He is also the author of The Devil and Sherlock Holmes. His work has garnered several honors for outstanding journalism, including a George Polk Award.

     Publisher: Doubleday Books

    Photo credit: DavidGrann.com

    DEADLINE FOR REGISTRATION: Tuesday, April 3, 2018


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